DEW employee works hand-in-hand with economic developers

tiffany

Tiffany Jasper says she is a translator.

As the business economic development manager for the S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce (DEW), Jasper reaches out to local officials to find out what skills and talents their workforce has and translates that information for economic developers in their efforts to attract businesses to their areas.

Jasper certainly understands the roles economic developers play. Before joining DEW a few months ago, she worked in economic development for Lexington County.

The other part of her job is letting industry associations and chambers of commerce know what information and services the agency can provide.

“I spend all my time with economic developers and industry-related associations,” she said. “When I meet with them I simply ask ‘what is going on?’ It’s more of a listening session and then I can determine ways to help.”

And when she meets with someone she takes them something of value, such as our workforce data which extremely important for economic developers, she said.

While Jasper doesn’t work directly with individual businesses, she recognizes that each business is different and programs and services must be tailored to their specific needs. But first she must get out to the businesses through the chambers and associations what services DEW can provide.

You can reach Jasper at tjasper@dew.sc.gov.

 

Can you contest your tax rate?

Can you contest your tax rate?

Having recently received your 2017 tax rate notice, you may have questions about how they are determined or disagree with the rate given to your business. So what do you do?

Unfortunately, South Carolina laws governing the tax rate assignment do not provide for an appeals process. However, if you disagree with the historical information contained in your notice of contribution rate you can submit a written request for a review within 30 days from the date on the notice. You must submit your request, along with any documentation of errors either by email at rateinfo@dew.sc.gov, fax 803-737-2862 or by mail at:

S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce
Experience Rate Section
P.O. Box 995
Columbia, SC 29202

The tax rates, according to state law, adjust automatically each year based on a formula that considers the following:

  • Projected benefit costs for the year (“base rate”)
  • Projected amount required to return the Trust Fund to an adequate balance by 2020 (“solvency surcharge”)

Tax rates are set each year to fund these components. Each employer is also responsible for a Departmental Administrative Contingency Assessment (DACA) surcharge of 0.06 percent which is added to the base rate and interest surcharge:

Total Tax Rate = Base Rate + Solvency Surcharge + DACA

If you have additional questions, you can contact the employer tax services line at 803-737-3080. To view the 2017 Tax Rate Chart click here.

Board aims to inform businesses of services, resources

One of the priorities of the State Workforce Development Board (SWDB) is to make sure businesses understand the workforce services and resources available throughout the state. In particular, the role of the SC Works centers as well as that of DEW have been known for unemployment benefits when individuals are out of work; however, there is a significant investment by these agencies to leverage skills training, soft skills, career pathways and more, all in an effort to support the needs of South Carolina industry.

In order to educate businesses and encourage them to take full advantage of the programs available, a business engagement group was created with the collaboration of the Local Workforce Development Boards. Last year, the group exceeded their goal of reaching 10,000 businesses. This year the group is focusing on continuing outreach while digging deeper with current relationships to elaborate on services specific to a company’s needs.

Some examples of programs created to connect individuals with quality employment as well as establish a talent pipeline where businesses can find a workforce with skills specific to their industry, include:

On the Job Training

Incumbent Worker Training

WorkKeys® Assessments

Apprenticeships

Rapid Response

Employee Search Assistance

Connecting businesses with other agencies based on an assessment of workforce needs

One program that is particularly helpful to businesses and that the board is funding this year is job profiling. Job profiles are available through the S.C. Work Ready Communities initiative. This customized measurement tool identifies skills and skill levels needed to perform a job in your company. The skill level is then matched with a WorkKeys® test score. By profiling your jobs, you can feel confident using WorkKeys® tests to make your selection, training and advancement decisions.

To meet with a member of the business engagement group and learn more about the resources available, visit our website at https://dew.sc.gov/about-dew/locations to call your local SC Works center and ask to speak with a business consultant.

 

 

Save the date for the Workforce Development Symposium

Mark your calendar to attend the 2017 Workforce Development Symposium on February 18-19 at the Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center.

The event is hosted by the State Workforce Development Board, S.C. Chamber of Commerce and the S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce.

Learn from other businesses about successful apprenticeships, hiring practices in a tight labor market and about other programs available through the Department of Employment and Workforce that will help fill key positions.

More information will be available soon.

SWDB delivers workforce solutions

Welcome to the inaugural issue of the State Workforce Development Board (SWDB) newsletter. This monthly publication will provide you with information regarding the work being done to create and promote a ready and skilled workforce. The board, chaired by Mikee Johnson CEO of Cox Industries, provides direction to the state’s workforce system on issues pertaining to labor force development, particularly those concerning the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).

The mission of SWDB is to create a competitive workforce advantage for South Carolina by ensuring that a quality and effective workforce system exists in order to improve the prosperity of businesses and the lives of South Carolinians.

The board is comprised of a majority of business leaders. Other members include legislators of the South Carolina Senate and House, local elected officials, workforce partners and representatives of community-based organizations. Members of the board are appointed by and serve at the pleasure of Gov. Nikki Haley.

Two issues the board has initiated are the S.C. Talent Pipeline and SC Work Ready Communities project.

S.C. Talent Pipeline is the newest initiative where the state workforce system has partnered with the S.C. Department of Commerce, S.C. Department of Education and the S.C. Technical College System to provide a workforce supply chain for the state’s growing industries.

S.C. Talent Pipeline strategies take a comprehensive, broad-based approach to identifying and addressing skill needs across key industries within a region rather than focusing on the workforce needs of individual businesses on a case-by-case, transactional basis.

The local groups will be relying on businesses to provide input on job skills needed now and in the future.

The Work Ready Communities project has grown substantially as South Carolina has become the first state in the nation to have all of its counties certified as Work Ready. Under this program and the use of WorkKeys testing, employers can match jobseekers wit jobs based on their skill sets and individuals can identify careers that align with their results.

The certification allows the county to demonstrate to potential businesses that they can provide them with a skilled workforce.

The board is working on many other projects from apprenticeships to incumbent workers training all to support South Carolina businesses.

SC Works Hartsville helps Army veteran start new career

Dehaven Williams successfully completed two tours of duty in Ft. Stewart, GA and then Korea before returning home to Hartsville, GA to seek employment.

Because Mr. Williams left the military with a service-related disability that prohibits him from performing certain tasks that require prolonged standing, he was concerned about his options in the job market.

He reached out to the veterans staff in the SC Works Hartsville center. Through veteran services and case management he was offered a position with AO Smith in McBee, a leading manufacturer of residential and commercial water heaters. Unfortunately, it turned out this position required long periods of standing which had the potential of making Mr. Williams disability worse.

Determined to find successful civilian employment, Mr. Williams talked further with a Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) at the Hartsville work center. The DVOP referred him to a local hiring fair sponsored by Palmetto Goodwill and was coordinated by Local Veteran’s Employment Representative (LVER), Keisha Bolden.

Goodwill employers were impressed by his resume, character and flawless interview. Only one week later he received an offer of employment as a sales associate.

Mr. Williams says that he is excited about his new position and has set his goals toward a future management position.

Walgreens is a model of inclusiveness

There is no “them” at the Walgreens distribution center in Anderson.

The 1 million-square-foot distribution center has become the model for hiring people with disabilities. Currently, about 40 percent of the center’s staff is made up of people with a registered disability. Recently the State Workforce Development Board Priority Population committee toured the facility to learn about the company’s practices.

Randy Lewis, Walgreen’s senior vice president of supply chain and logistics, implemented the idea of hiring people with disabilities as a result of his personal experience of having a son with a disability.

The company provides work environments that are inclusive that include visuals on the work process, touch screens computers with large icons and flexible workstations.

The company works with S.C. Vocational Rehabilitation, which works with the client during a 12-week training period. After that time, the company may offer the individual a full-time job. The company has said people with disabilities receive the same pay and work beside with all other employees.

“People with disabilities like to work. They want to be here,” said Lasandra Aiken, with the S.C. Vocational Rehabilitation Department in Anderson. She added that she has placed 54 clients with the company and has had only two quit.

 

Disaster Unemployment Assistance available for two counties affected by Hurricane Matthew

For Immediate Release

October 17, 2016

Disaster Unemployment Assistance available
for two counties affected by Hurricane Matthew

COLUMBIA – Gov. Nikki Haley and the S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce announced today that Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) will be made available to assist people who became unemployed as a direct result of Hurricane Matthew.

The counties included in the DUA program are Marion and Orangeburg counties. Other counties may be added at a later date.

The DUA program makes funds available to assist people who became unemployed as a direct result of Hurricane Matthew. It also is available to small business owners and the self-employed, including 1099 contract workers, who lost personal income due to the disaster.

DEW Executive Director Cheryl Stanton said South Carolina workers may be eligible for unemployment insurance benefits under the DUA program.

Workers or business owners meeting the following criteria may be eligible for benefits:

  • Individuals who are unemployed due to the disaster, and do not qualify for regular unemployment insurance benefits.
  • Self-employed individuals and small business owners who lost income due to the disaster.
  • Individuals who were prevented from working due to an injury caused by the disaster.
  • Individuals who have become the major supplier of household income due to the disaster-related death or injury of the previous major supplier of household income.
  • Individuals who are unable to reach their job or self-employment location because they must travel through the affected area and are prevented from doing so by the disaster.
  • Individuals who were to commence employment or self-employment but were prevented by the disaster.

Individuals must first apply for regular unemployment insurance (UI) benefits. To apply, call 1-866-831-1724 or go to mybenefits.dew.sc.gov. The deadline for applying is 30 calendar days from the date that DEW announces the availability of DUA in the county. If the individual is found to be ineligible for UI benefits, a DEW representative will contact them directly and will assist with the DUA application.

Applications filed after the deadline will be considered untimely and DUA benefits may be denied unless the individual provides good cause for filing after that date. Applicants must submit their Social Security number, check stubs and other documentation to support the claim that they were working or self-employed when the disaster occurred. In some cases, additional documentation may be required.

Please check www.dew.sc.gov/dua for updates on this program.

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About SCDEW

The South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce is putting South Carolinians to work. The agency invests in building a pipeline of quality workers, matches workers with jobs, and is a bridge for individuals who find themselves out of work for no fault of their own. This promotes financial stability and economic prosperity for employers, individuals and communities. SCDEW is dedicated to advancing South Carolina through services that meet the needs of the state’s businesses, jobseekers and those looking to advance their careers.

Statement on August 2016 Unemployment Rate

For Immediate Release

Sept. 20, 2016

DEW Executive Director Cheryl Stanton’s Statement

August 2016 Employment Statement

“South Carolina’s economy continued its robust growth in August as the state’s unemployment rate fell to the lowest level since May 2001. When businesses decide to expand or locate here, they are showing confidence that a pool of skilled workers is available,” said Cheryl Stanton, executive director of the S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce. “In the last year, more than 54,000 people have found work and are again providing for themselves. However, we still have work to do in finding jobs for the 117,000 unemployed.”

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About SCDEW

The South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce is putting South Carolinians to work. The agency invests in building a pipeline of quality workers, matches workers with jobs, and is a bridge for individuals who find themselves out of work for no fault of their own. This promotes financial stability and economic prosperity for employers, individuals and communities. SCDEW is dedicated to advancing South Carolina through services that meet the needs of the state’s businesses, jobseekers and those looking to advance their careers.

Employment Situation for August 2016

For Immediate Release

Sept. 20, 2016

 

South Carolina’s Employment Situation August 2016

 Unemployment Rate Falls to 5.1 Percent,

Fourth Consecutive Monthly Drop

South Carolina’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate dropped for the fourth consecutive month to 5.1 percent in August from 5.2 percent in July.

Unemployment fell by 3,856 people to 116,998. Employment also decreased by 2,009 to 2,180,876. This resulted in a decline in the labor force of 5,865 to 2,297,874. Since August 2015, employment has increased by 54,553 along with an increase of 45,086 for the labor force. Unemployment fell by 9,467.

Nationally, the unemployment rate remained the same from July to August at 4.9 percent.

Nonfarm Employment by Industry (Seasonally Adjusted1)

Seasonally adjusted, nonfarm payroll employment in August increased by 5,700 over the month to a record high level of 2,060,800.

 Industries experiencing employment increases were Education and Health Services (+2,600); Trade, Transportation, and Utilities (+1,400); Other Services (+900); Manufacturing (+400); Information (+300); Construction (+200); Financial Activities (+200); and Professional and Business Services (+100). Government employment remained the same, and Leisure and Hospitality (-400) noted a decline.

Compared to August 2015, seasonally adjusted, nonfarm employment increased 50,500 with upswings in Professional and Business Services (+13,100); Education and Health Services (+11,200); Government (+8,800); Construction (+5,400); Trade, Transportation, and Utilities (+4,500); Financial Activities (+3,700); Leisure and Hospitality (+2,100); Manufacturing (+2,000); and Other Services (+300). Information (-700) saw a dip in payroll.

Nonfarm Employment by Industry (Not Seasonally Adjusted2)

From July to August, not seasonally adjusted, nonfarm payroll employment tallied an increase of 1,600 to a level of 2,056,600. Historically, employment experiences growth during August as schools gear up for the fall semester. The rise was due to increases in Education and Health Services (+3,300); Government (+2,000); Other Services (+900); and Financial Activities (+100). Losses occurred in Leisure and Hospitality (-2,500); Professional and Business Services (-1,300); and Construction (-900). There was no movement in Mining and Logging; Manufacturing; Trade, Transportation, and Utilities; and Information during the month of August.

Year over year, not seasonally adjusted, nonfarm jobs improved (+43,700) with growth in Professional and Business Services (+12,600); Education and Health Services (+9,400); Government (+5,300); Construction (+5,200); Trade, Transportation, and Utilities (+3,900); Financial Activities (+2,800); Leisure and Hospitality (+2,600); Manufacturing (+2,200); Mining and Logging (+100); and Other Services (+100). Information (-500) fell slightly.

 

1Seasonally Adjusted: Seasonal adjustment removes the effects of events that follow a more or less regular pattern each year (i.e. tourist-related hiring and school closings in the summer). These adjustments make it easier to observe the cyclical and other nonseasonal movements in data over time.

 

2Not Seasonally Adjusted: Effects of regular or seasonal patterns have not been removed from these data.

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